California Studies Association

The latest news, events, and perspectives from the CSA


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MONSTER STORM: 1861-62 FLOODS AND THEIR LEGACY TODAY

Marcia Eymann, Sacramento City Historian, and Dale Cox, U.S. Geological Survey, will discuss the past effects and future implications of the most damaging California flood and storm season on record.  The talk, part of the UCB California Studies Dinner Seminar series, will be on Thursday, March 21, 7-9 p.m. at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way Berkeley (just east of Telegraph Ave.)   Admission (including dinner) free.

RSVP: Myra Armstrong, zulu2@berkeley.edu


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IMAGES OF THE PACIFIC RIM: AUSTRALIA AND CALIFORNIA 1850-1935

Author Erika Esau, formerly of the Australian National University, Canberra, will discuss her recent book on the cultural links between Australia and California on Wednesday, February 20, 7-9 p.m.  The talk is part of the UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar series and is held at the Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley (just above Telegraph Ave.).  The event, including dinner, is free.

RSVP: Myra Armstrong, zulu2@berkeley.edu.


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Web resource on Berkeley historical landmarks and subjects

The Berkeley Historical Plaque Project has produced over 100 actual and virtual markers of this city’s rich culture. It’s a great example of using the Web to share history and geographical content. Subjects include a huge range –  fitness guru Jack Lalanne, film critic Pauline Kael, the Patty Hearst kidnapping, and environmentalist David Brower.
My own contribution was an illustrated essay on
Sidewalk Contractor Stamps. [LMC]Image


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Wherever There’s a Fight!

San Francisco is rich in civil rights history – but you may have walked past certain street corners many times and not realized that battles were fought there for labor rights, lesbian and gay equality, freedom of expression, disability rights and more.   Join Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi, coauthors of Wherever There’s a Fight:  How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers, and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California takes us on a virtual tour that uncovers San Francisco’s hidden history – from the Yick Wo Laundry, whose owner challenged anti-Chinese laws,  to the Votes for Women Club where working women organized their victorious campaign for suffrage, to the site of a police raid on a lesbian and gay New Year’s Eve gala that predated Stonewall.

Wednesday, February 13 from 6:30 – 8 PM, at the San Francisco Main Public Library.