California Studies Association

The latest news, events, and perspectives from the CSA


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UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar May 17, 2018: Chuck Wollenberg, “Rebel Lawyer: Wayne Collins and the Defense of Japanese American Rights”

With all deliberate chutzpah, seminar convener Chuck Wollenberg has scheduled himself for the final session of the academic year on Thursday, May 17.  He will discuss his new book, “Rebel Lawyer: Wayne Collins and the Defense of Japanese American Rights” published by Heyday.  Collins, perhaps the most important civil rights lawyer almost no one has ever heard of, represented defendants in the Korematsu and Tokyo Rose cases, among others.  His opposition to racism and defense of civil liberties, even in time of war, resonates today in the Age of Trump.  Wollenberg is former History Instructor and Chair of the Social Science Department at Berkeley City College.  He is the author of several books and articles, including “Berkeley a City in History.”

The session will be at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way (just east of Telegraph Ave.) from 7-9:15 p.m.  Free admission and dinner.

Contact Charlotte Rutty at charlotterutty@berkeley.edu.

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UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar, April 18, 2018: Tomas Summers Sandoval “The Vietnam War in Mexican America”

Professor Tomas Summers Sandoval will discuss his research on the impact of the Vietnam War on the Chicano community on Wednesday, April 18.  More than 200,000 Mexican Americans served in Vietnam, and Sandoval has explored the effects of the war on both individuals and the community through oral histories of Chicano veterans and community members.  A Professor of History at Pomona College with a Ph.D from UC Berkeley, Sandoval plans to publish the results of his research both as a book and as a dramatic performance piece.

The session will be from 7:00 to 9:15 p.m. at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way (just east of Telegraph Ave.).  Free admission and dinner.

Contact Charlotte Rutty, charlotterutty@berkeley.edu.


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UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar: Sandra Nichols and Friends, “Uncovering the Lost Latino History of the Napa Valley” March 22, 2018

Sandra Nichols and Latina students from Napa Valley College will discuss the Latino history of the Napa Valley on Thursday, March 22, 2018.  Latinos have played a central role in the economic and social development of the valley from the original Mexican land grants in the 1830s to the crucial participation of Latinos in today’s winery and vineyard workforce.   Nichols and a group of Napa Valley College students have been working to uncover this largely lost history, with particular emphasis on the impact of the Bracero Program of the 1940s and 50s.  Nichols is a geography scholar with special expertise in patterns of Latino migration in California and has been affiliated with the UCB Geography Department and the California Institute for Rural Studies in Davis.  She will be accompanied by students who have combined historical research with contemporary activism.

The session will be from 7-9:15 p.m. at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley (just east of Telegraph Ave.).  Free admission and dinner.

Contact Charlotte Rutty at charlotterutty@berkeley.edu


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UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar, Feb. 21, 2018: Hiya Swanhuyser, “The City Will Never Be The Same: Lost Radical Cultures in San Francisco’s Montgomery Block”

On Wednesday, February 21, San Francisco author and journalist Hiya Swanhuyser will discuss her forthcoming book on San Francisco’s Montgomery Block.  When it was built in 1853, the “Monkey Block”was probably the largest and most important office building in the Far West.  But as the commercial center of the city moved south, the building became occupied by bohemian artists, writers, and cultural radicals.  Hiya Swanhuyser considers the role and heritage of the Montgomery Block (now the site of the TransAmerica Pyramid) as the center of San Francisco’s first counter culture.

The session will be from 7-9:15 p.m. at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley (one-half block east of Telegraph Ave).

Free admission and dinner.  Contact Charlotte Rutty, charlotterutty@berkeley.edu.

(Rachel Brahinsky’s presentation, originally scheduled for Feb. 21st, has been rescheduled for the fall.)


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UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar: Thomas Osborne, “Coastal Sage: Peter Douglas and the Fight to Save California’s Shore,” January 17, 2018

On Wednesday, January 17, Thomas Osborne will discuss his new UC Press book on Peter Douglas and the California Coastal Commission.  Douglas was co-author of the 1972 Coastal Protection Initiative and the 1975 Coastal Act.  A dedicated environmentalist, he served as executive director of the Coastal Commission for 26 years and waged battles to regulate shoreline development and assure public access to California’s beaches.  Thomas Osborne is Emeritus Professor of History at Santa Ana College and author of several works, including Pacific El Dorado, a History of Greater California.

The session will be from 7-9:15 p.m. at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley (just east of Telegraph Ave.).  Free admission and dinner.

Contact Charlotte Rutty at charlotterutty@berkeley.edu.


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UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar: Spring Semester, 2018 Speaker Schedule

January 17  Thomas Osborne on his new book on the California Coastal Commission published by UC Press,”Coastal Sage: Peter Douglas and the Fight to Save the Shore.”

February 21  Rachel Brahinsky, University of San Francisco, on her forthcoming “People’s Guide to the Bay Area.”

March 22  Sandra Nichols on her student-researched study of the Latino History of the Napa Valley.

April 18  Tomas Sandoval, Pomona College, on his forthcoming book and play on Chicanos and the Vietnam War.

May 17  Chuck Wollenberg on his new book published by Heyday, “Rebel Lawyer: Wayne Collins and the Defense of Japanese American Rights.”

 

The seminar meets at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way from 7 to 9:15 p.m.  Free admission and dinner.

Contact Charlotte Rutty at charlotterutty@berkeley.edu

 


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UC Berkeley California Studies Dinner Seminar: November 16, 2017, James Zarsadiaz “Asian Americans and the Appeal of ‘Country Living’: Suburbia”

On Thursday, November 16, Professor James Zarsadiaz of the University of San Francisco will discuss the establishment and growth  of Asian American suburban communities in the Los Angeles region since 1970.  The development of these communities has been a sharp departure from the traditional pattern of white, middle class suburbs and is an important component of California’s new social geography.  Dr. Zarsadiaz is Assistant Professor of History and Director of the university’s Yuchengco Philippine Studies Center.  He is the author of several articles that have appeared in The Journal of Urban History, American Studies, and in mainstream media, including the Washington Post, City Lab by the Atlantic, and the San Francisco Chronicle.

The session will be at the UCB Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, 2521 Channing Way, Berkeley (one-half block east of Telegraph Ave.), from 7-9:15 p.m.

Free admission and dinner.

Contact: Charlotte Rutty, charlotterutty@berkeley.edu